fog


fog
[[t]fɒ̱g[/t]]
fogs, fogging, fogged
1) N-VAR When there is fog, there are tiny drops of water in the air which form a thick cloud and make it difficult to see things.

The crash happened in thick fog...

These ocean fogs can last for days.

2) N-SING: usu N of n A fog is an unpleasant cloud of something such as smoke inside a building or room.

...a fog of stale cigarette smoke.

3) N-SING: oft in N, N of n You can use fog to refer to a situation which stops people from being able to notice things, understand things, or think clearly.

The most basic facts about him are lost in a fog of mythology and folklore...

Synchronizing these attacks may also be difficult in the fog of war...

His mind was in a fog when he finally got up.

4) V-ERG If a window, mirror, or other glass surface fogs or is fogged, it becomes covered with very small drops of water so that you cannot see things clearly through it or in it.

The windows fogged immediately...

[V n] Water had fogged his diving mask and he couldn't remember how to clear it...

[V-ed] The car windows were fogged with vapor.

PHR-V-ERG
Fog up means the same as fog.

V P The car windows fogged up... V P n (not pron) It'd fog up their telescopes... V-ed P His hair was all wet and his glasses were fogged up.


English dictionary. 2008.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Fog — (f[o^]g), n. [Dan. sneefog snow falling thick, drift of snow, driving snow, cf. Icel. fok spray, snowdrift, fj[=u]k snowstorm, fj[=u]ka to drift.] 1. Watery vapor condensed in the lower part of the atmosphere and disturbing its transparency. It… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Fog — steht für Ian Marko Fog (*1973), dänischer Handballspieler Um die Welt mit Willy Fog, Figur des Trickfilms Shadows and Fog, US Filmkomödie von Woody Allen (1991) The Fog of War, US Dokumentarfilm Bakersfield Fog, US Sportverein Fiber Optical Gyro …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • fog — fog1 [fôg, fäg] n. [prob. < Scand, as in ON fok, Dan (sne)fog, driving snow, Norw dial. fuka, sea mist < IE base * pū , to puff up, blow, of echoic orig.] 1. a large mass of water vapor condensed to fine particles, at or just above the… …   English World dictionary

  • fog´gi|ly — fog|gy «FOG ee, FG », adjective, gi|er, gi|est. 1. having much fog; misty; murky: »If it is cloudy, rainy, or foggy, the water vapor in the air is condensing (Beauchamp, Mayfield, and …   Useful english dictionary

  • fog|gy — «FOG ee, FG », adjective, gi|er, gi|est. 1. having much fog; misty; murky: »If it is cloudy, rainy, or foggy, the water vapor in the air is condensing (Beauchamp, Mayfield, and …   Useful english dictionary

  • Fog — (f[o^]g), n. [Cf. Scot. fog, fouge, moss, foggage rank grass, LL. fogagium, W. ffwg dry grass.] (Agric.) (a) A second growth of grass; aftergrass. (b) Dead or decaying grass remaining on land through the winter; called also {foggage}. [Prov.Eng.] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Fog — (f[o^]g), v. t. (Agric.) To pasture cattle on the fog, or aftergrass, of; to eat off the fog from. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • fog — [n1] heavy mist that reduces visibility brume, cloud, effluvium, film, gloom, grease, ground clouds, haze, London fog, miasma, murk, murkiness, nebula, obscurity, pea soup*, smaze, smog, smoke, smother, soup*, steam, vapor, visibility zero zero* …   New thesaurus

  • Fog — Fog, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Fogged}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Fogging}.] 1. To envelop, as with fog; to befog; to overcast; to darken; to obscure. [1913 Webster] 2. (Photog.) To render semiopaque or cloudy, as a negative film, by exposure to stray light,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Fog — (f[o^]g), v. i. [Etymol. uncertain.] To practice in a small or mean way; to pettifog. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Where wouldst thou fog to get a fee? Dryden. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Fog — Fog, v. i. (Photog.) To show indistinctly or become indistinct, as the picture on a negative sometimes does in the process of development. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


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